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Book Review: The Gut Balance Revolution by Gerard Mullin, MD

19 November 2015 - Posted by Kathryn Kos

Dr. Mullins writes an eye-opening piece about the correlation between obesity and an imbalance in gut flora. He starts by sharing a very raw story about his own experiences struggling with obesity, and dealing with shame and blame from his own Doctor. Dr. Mullins wanted to dig deeper and understand the mechanism behind obesity. He knew there was more to it than diet.

Obesity is not just about overeating, and this book teaches us the science behind why this is the case. Dr. Mullins explains the 7 pathways to dysbiosis or gut flora imbalance, and the impact this has on our immune system and the regulation of our metabolism.

Your gut flora represent a highly diverse ecosystem whose composition is as unique as your fingerprint. The more diverse it is, the healthier you are. Your gut ecosystem is delicately balanced between many friendly symbiotes, and a limited number of potentially harmful pathogens that are prevented from gaining a foothold and triggering an aggressive immune response.

The type of flora in your gut has a profound influence on your weight. Diet influences gut microbiome. In this book, Mullins discusses how “leanless” is transferrable, in a diet that promotes the growth of healthy flora. He also covers fecal transplants and the ability to acquire leanless through the fecal bacteria of a lean individual. It is fascinating to understand the impact of our gut bacteria on the health of our body as a whole.

One important topic that Dr. Mullins discusses is birth and breastfeeding. Infants actually swallow bacteria from the vagina at birth, and this helps to inoculate the infant with good bacteria in their gut. Babies born via C-section start life with few healthy microbes in their gut. This results in a higher risk of developing disease and obesity later in life. He goes on to explore the hygiene hypothesis, and how over sanitizing and avoiding exposure to dirt also impacts the gut flora and overall health of our children.

Dr. Mullins goes on to explain other pathways by which our gut flora is affected, such as inflammation and autoimmunity, our specific gut-bug type or “fingerprint” and the influence that has on our immune health, as well as our diet, SIBO (small intestinal bacterial overgrowth) and the gut brain connection.

The factors that lead to weight gain and weight loss are far more reaching and include genetic predisposition, phenotypical influences (like diet, lifestyle, and stress), blood sugar and insulin balance, hormone regulation, inflammation, energy metabolism, and more.

Dr. Mullins not only details what the mechanisms are behind gut dysbiosis, but then goes on to explain how to counteract these effects, and re-establish a healthy gut microbiome.

Dr. Mullins details precise ways to increase healthy gut flora, thus changing the health of the body. This book is helpful for both practitioners trying to find answers for their struggling clients, as well as the general public struggling with weight loss and other related health issues.

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